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at film from august of 1963 as demonstration and marchers gathered on the mall here in washington d.c. this was the headline from the washington post, a mammoth rally of 200,000 jamming the mall in a solemn orderly plea for equality. that's our line for those of you over the age of 50. for those of you under the age of 50. 585-3880. 202 is the area code here in washington d.c. we'll get your call on march. >> your calls and comments in a moment. lots get to the other stories this morning that is latest development from syria and headlines from overseas. the guardian newspaper the attack on syria just days away as the house of commons recalled for a vote and the picture of the british prime minster as he departs yesterday as the parliament resuming session tomorrow breaking from their august recess. from the marine herald, -- miami herald, a stage is set. u.s. and allies act as syria's intelligence mount. as u.s. officials said privately that a flood of previously undisclosed intelligence including satellite images and intercepted communication erased last minute administration doubt
washington martha. she was always called patsy as lady bird johnson was never called claudia. so i was just wondering, you mentioned in his letters when he referred to her in his letter that it was just mentioned on the telephone that he did call her patsy. and i also wanted to mention that in the story that i'm reading about martha and george washington that the house, mt. vernon, was originally the home of his half brother, george washington's half brother. that he lived in a smaller farm. and i wondered if you are going to talk anything about his years as a surveyor or is this really about the years with martha as an adult? >> thank versus much. this is actually martha washington's time in the sun. so we won't talk about george's early career. what about the nickname patsy? >> patsy, pat, patty were the nicknames for martha in those days just as peg or peggy is a nickname for margaret. the martha nickname has fallen out of favor. nobody was named patricia back then. the only patsies were martha's. that was simply the common name. >> the smaller farm she's reference ing? >> smaller, it wa
the anniversary of the "i have a dream" speech and the famous march on washington. that pivotal moment in history signaled a turning point in the nation's civil right movement with a quarter of million people marming for equal rights. as it was back then, many are getting set now to speak out on dr. king's dream. and the movement. the march begins shortly down independence avenue, passing the new martin luther king memorial and winds up at the washington monument. that is where doug mckelway is standing by on what is a gorgeous day in our nation's capital city. hi, doug. >> it is a gorgeous day. a spectacular day for the event today. the march on washington in 1963 was the single largest gathering of people in washington up until that time. i'll let the ambulance pass by here. join me as i step on the curb here. all right. there we go. there have been largeer crowds sincebe that day but up until that time it was the largest crowd. the national park service stopped measuring crowd size since the million man march because they were criticized to overestimate size crowd by some groups and underestim
warner has the latest on options for action in syria. then we return to the march on washington 50 years on. tonight reflections from the last living speaker, georgia congressman john liu business. >> it was all inclusive it was black and white, latino, asia asian-american and native american. >> they came from idaho, wyoming, and they were there. carrying their signs. >> and we conclude our series on governing in a time of gridlock with a look at how the entertainment world sees the nation's capital. >> the question we ask is if someone is actually getting something done, do the ends justify the means? it is an interesting question to ask when washington is paralyzed by gridlock. >> that is all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by... moving our economy for 160 years, bnsf the engine that connects us. >> and the hewlett foundation working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and this program was made possible by the corporation for pub
the dream and the dreamer 50 years later. >> thousands of people making their way through washington, d.c. for days of festivities marking that historic speech from dr. martin about howg jr. and the march on much this day this movement has changed life for africa americans. what has it meant for if you? >> well, the original march was a turning point for me in my life because it was the first time that i was able to really stand up for what i believed. i knew it was right. i knew it was right to my bones to go to >> yeah 7. >> for his take on today's event gas thevent, for the first timee have whites and blacks in intimate settings, allowed to go to church together, organize together, it was those relationships away from the camera, away from the microphones that allowed folks to get to know each other in ways that they hadn't been able to get to know each other before. >> reporter: mr. neil there is so much emphasis on dr. king, but the movement took place in basements around the countriers people who were afraid they would lose their jobs. >> these are folks who were organizers at the
, is to follow the efforts in washington today to present all of the options. >> so you do believe there would have to be a man date first from an international body? >> that's what he has said. if he can't get the united neighborhoods there are other man datas he could look for. >> is at this point all hope for diplomatic solution lost. >> it's very hard to see a diplomatic solution. the opposition has dis united. the government made up its mind to crush the rebellions and uprisings that were occurring around at a time country. it's going to be very hard to get people negotiating for a solution. >> all right. ambassador richard murphy, we thank you so much for coming in this morning. >> pleasure. >>> it's shaping up to be a beautiful morning across the northeast. high pressure is in control. and we continue to deal with nothing but sunshine. take a look. hard to find anything here on the radar. clear skies. we did have a cold front push through earlier on the week. luckily, now, the skies are shaping up. it's going to be a gorgeous day temperaturewise, nice and comfortable. in albany, 76. new
anniversary of the march on washington. inside story is next. >>> 50 years after the march on washington there are lingering challenges to the modern social justice movement and a modern debathe as to how to accomplish dr. king's dream. this is inside story. hello everybody i'm david shuster, it was called a march for jobs and freedom. hundreds of thousands of peaceful protestors gathered on the national mall and ignited a new conversation about civil rights in america. highlighted by the march and by dr. martin luther king jr.'s i have a dream speech are still alive today. still ahead, we'll examine inquality and social justice. finally, we'll take you to an organizer who was there. joyce ladner. >> i had a stage pass. no one on that stage had ever seen that many people before. that's the major one memory. i have a lot of others as well. >> was it an energetic crowd? was it a me mesmerized crowd? >> it was a very friendly crowd. it was almost like meeting new friends. it was easy going. it was an easy crowd. >> was there a sense that eventually society would progress and things would ch
approaches this situation is a top priority. "the washington post" published something online that u.s.,s details about the that the budget has grown enormously since 9/11, that the cia is far bigger than outside experts had estimated, that the u.s. is involved in new cyber programs to attack other programs in countries. this information has never been released despite efforts from outside folks. does the president believe this is helpful now and the current climate to have discussion about the details about how the u.s. is spending its money in these departments to get a better understanding, as he said, make the public comfortable with how this money is being spayed and what type of programs are being used? -- that storyhed was published since i walked out here. i'm not in a position to comment on a specific story. the president believes that strengthening public confidence in these programs is important to the success of these programs. there is little debate about the fact these programs are critical to our national security, that they have made a role in protecting the homeland
rights movement. to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. i am proud to stand before you as the first african-american, first woman city administrator. >> [applause] >>thank you. i i am grateful to be inspired and mentored by many great civil rights leaders and my educational leaders which includes usf law school. >> [applause] >> and my family members who have mentored me and have paved the way for me along my career path. i could not have gotten there without them. my greatest inspirations are my parents william little and maria little, and i my greatest inspirations are my parents william little and maria little, and i want to talk about howthey were inspired by the march on washington and dr. king's speech which subsequently has passed on to me. my mother was among the 200,000 people who joined dr. martin they were inspired by the march on washington and dr. king's speech which subsequently has passed on to me. my mother was among the 200,000 people who joined dr. martin luther king on the march on washington 50 years ago and stood up for the rights for freedom.
are coming, indeed. ron mott, thank you. "the washington post," as was recognized by the post itself this past weekend barely mentioned the reverend king speech because he was the last speaker. they had gone to to press and it was not really notable to a lot of reporters who were covering it here in washington, d.c. you've been following this from our bureau in washington. all of these reflections of history come together. identify talked to jesse jackson today and he said this is the moment where president obama needs to do what lbj did and set out a legislative mandate for the dream and that voting rights is a constitutional amendment. that's the focus. that and on economic injustice and equality. >> i think it also puts a spotlight on the relationship between presidents like kennedy or president obama and a leader like martin luther king. let's go back to reality. in the sprachk 1963 president kennedy did not want this march to happen. he thought it would get out of control. he thought it might have speakers like john lewis who would go in directions more radical. he kept his deta
to make the first march on washington and i never really got over that until president obama said please lead us in the invocation, and that was in january of this year. thank you reverend sharpton and others for asking me to lend a few words to this most precious gatheri gathering as i look out at the crowd, i find myself saying, what are we doing today? where have we come from? what has been accomplished and where do we go from this point forwa forward? i think of one theme that has been played over and over in the past few months and it's one that bring great controversy. stand your ground. and we can think of standing your ground in the negative, but i ask you today to flip that coin and make stand your ground a positive ring for all of us who believe in freedom and justice and equality, that we stand firm on the ground that we have already made and be sure that nothing is taken away from us because there are efforts to turn back the clock of freedom. and i ask you today will you allow that to happen? take the words "stand your ground" in a positive sense. stand your ground in terms
king, jr.'s, famous, i have a dream speech in washington. >> more people there than i have ever seen in one place in my entire life. >> hear from a bay area woman who attended that historic march and how she and others are commemorating king's legacy. >> vendors supplying your produce, fighting for space. no more. the new plan to bring them all under one roof. >> it is back. a chance a authority back in the forecast. we'll pinpoint the location as the news continues right here on the cw. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, washington today, to commeme >>> tens of thousands of people packed the national mall in washington today to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the historic march on washington for civil rights. family members of reverend martin luther king, jr., delivered his famous, i have a dream speech at the march led today's event along with other civil rights leaders. >> this is not the time for a commemoration, nor is this the time for self-congratulations celebration. the task is not done. the journey is not complete. >> some of those in the crowd had attended the march 50 years ago, the
our march on washington conversation series, as a father and son reflect on what that event has young people were found with courage and some often radical symptoms, i wouldn't have the >> ifill: and we close with the story of army staff sergeant ty michael carter, who received the nation's highest military honor today for his bravery druing the war on afghanistan. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the united states insisted today it is "undeniable" that syria's rulers gassed their own people last week, just outside damascus. that was coupled with new warnings of repercussions yet to opportun
. >>> as dawn broke on washington, d.c., 50 years ago today, no one knew what to expect. dr. martin luther king, junior had been up most of the night in his room writing and rewriting the speech he was to give that day, though the most sub lime passage would never appear on that page. the earliest press reports that morning suggested that only about 25,000 people would show up. organizers of the march on washington for jobs and freedom were nervous. putting out fires, working behind the scenes to keep the collision behind the march in tact and preparing to channel the sea of humanity that they hoped to call forth. and then the buses and the trains came, and the people came with them by the thousands. and by that afternoon, more than 200,000 people, black and white spread out before the shadow of the great emancipator, disciplined and skeweding the spirit of solidarity. they listened to speakers one by one who called the nation to meet the demands that justice placed upon it, and about 2:40 in the afternoon, the last speaker rose to the lectern. some fretted the tv cameras would be gone by the t
on anniversary of the march on washington, and the legacy of martin luther king jr.. series, first ladies, influence and image. over the next couple of hours, we will visit places with history curators. away fighting the revolutionary war, martha washington ran their plantation. >> it is clear that martha arrived at mount vernon in 1859 and there was a lot of management that she had to do. when she married george washington, she brings with her to mount vernon 12 housemates. that is really almost unimaginable luxury. these are slaves that are for the most part, not field labor, not producing crops, which is where your income is coming from. they are doing things like cooking, serving at table, clean the house, doing the laundry, doing selling, this is not productive labor in the sense that it is not productive income. she brings them with her and she brings financial resources to the marriage as well as her managerial skills. it makes mount vernon a successful operation and it makes it possible for washington to be away for eight years fighting a war. the fact that he has this support sys
be the secretary of dhs is the most thankless job in washington. that is not true. no doubt, it is a very big and comics job. it is literally a 24/7 job, that as my successor will soon learn, it is also one of the most rewarding jobs there is. what you do hear matters to the lives of people all across our great nation him and your decisions affect them in direct and tangible ways. you make sure their families are safe from terrorist threats, that their local first responders have equipment and training and funding, and that when disaster strikes people who have lost everything are given food and shelter and hope. and that thanks for that is not owed any single individual or cabinet secretary, but to that 240,000 dhs employees, many of whom work in tough conditions around the clock to accomplish our shared and noble mission, and that includes some who have made the ultimate sacrifice for our country. they are the backbone of your nation's homeland security, and over the past 4 1/2 years, it has been my pleasure to serve with them and build a more agile department of homeland security. i thank
night at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span programs on every first lady from martha washington to ida mckinley. tonight, sarah polk, mark rhett taylor and abigail fillmore. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] sarah polk was on diplomacy and her strong suit is intelligence and political discussion. >> she made no bones about the fact she took an interest in politics. and that she was her husband's partner. >> she grew naup political household in tennessee. her father was a local politician so she grew up loving politics. she married james after he won a seat in the legislature. because she would not have married him if he had -- >> unfortunately for james k. polk he died three months after leaving the white house. and sarah began a 42-year widowhood. polk place became a shrine to her husband and she would invite anybody who wanted to to come to visit and see the objects she had collected through her long and illustrious political career. >> to live there for many years on her own. during the civil war, generals on both
, the struggles of yesterday, and as we're approaching the an vary of the march on washington we have to wonder if the goals of the march on washington were met over the past 50 years. the answer to that is no, they were not. we need people not only as young as my grandchildren, they're great kids, weren't they? not only kids as young as my grandchildren, but people as old as you and i are. we need to put our shoulders to the wheel, ge make sure the figt gets done. >> michael: i don't know what you meant by people as old as you and i, but thank you for coming. i really appreciate it. >>> i'm looking at you, john boehner, politicians are on summer break, and what better place than des moines, really? donnie fowler and my good friend ben mankiewicz will collectively shape their views on that with me. they'll also share them. and ro khama getting ready for the silicon valley house seat. and whether vacationing or campaigning, a book that every lawmaker should have on their summer reading list, a dream foreclosed. i'll talk to the author about the people she met and the courageous action they have
-span. programs on every first lady, from martha washington. tonight, elizabeth munro and catherine adams. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] ♪ >> elizabeth monroe was a true partner in her husband's career. they were a love story and absolutely devoted to each other. elizabeth monroe had a well- developed sense of style and image. this is a woman who knew how to carry herself with great elegance. >> it is called the era of good feeling. >> this is a woman who spoke french. >> very great beauty. she received is seldom anything in the white house. she hated it. >> dignity, civility. those are the words that come to mind. >> elizabeth monroe served as first lady from 1817 to 1825 as a time known as the era of good feeling. coming up, we will explore her life and what were not always happy times inside the white house for this woman born into a well-to-do new york family. she married james monroe at the age of 17 and traveled new york extensively with him. she brought with her to the white house a certain french
have a dream" speech at the lincoln memorial, and thousands today are gathering on the washington mall to celebrate that historic event. >>> we start in syria where the government is now accusing rebel forces of using chemical weapons. the claim comes as president obama meets with his national security team at the white house to talk about the reports of chemical weapons attacks by the syrian government. syrian state tv says soldiers found chemical weapons in tunnels used by rebels. cnn cannot confirm those claims or the authenticity of these images. the opposition claims government forces launched a nerve gas attack, killing hundreds of civilians. meanwhile a top u.n. official is in damascus today asking to investigate the alleged use of chemical weapons by the syrian government. president obama sat down with our chris kuomo earlier and he said the u.s. is still gathering information on the attack. >> what we've seen indicates that this is clearly a big event of grave concern. and we are already in communications with the entire international community. we're moving through the u.n. t
cord, tacoma washington. >> a short time okay t hamid karzi reacted to the bales' sentencing >> a life sentence to him or a death sentence to him will not bring back our children that he killed. if will not bring back the happiness of those families and will not replace the loss that the afghan nation suffered. >>> karzi also said he does not back capital punishment and asked that the u.s. provided compensation to the families of those killed. >>> the sentencing phase of the trial begins made for major nadal hassan. a military jury found him guilty of killing 13 fellow soldiers in 2009. hassan admitted to the murders in court and had no reaction on friday when the guilty verdict was red. the jury will now decide if he will be executed for his crimes or spend the rest of his life in prison. >>> washington state police are hunting for a teenager who is suspected of beating an 88-year-old world war ii veteran to death. another teenager is already in custody for the crime. police found the veteran in his car on wednesday with serious injuries. he died in the hospital yesterday. so far, police do no
no washington. mike let's talk about this million stone of a million children as refugees. anyone can relate to a child. is there anything knows a volatile situation there. in kurdistan as we have just heard where the kurds control the area there is a danger of cross-border violence, so not a great situation -- a horrible situation, obviously. the united states so far has donated $1 billion. the state department will be quick to tell you that is more than any other nation, but donating $1 billion towards the refugees, richelle. >> let'sinternational cooperation to address what is happening. i'm going to read you a brief quote. mccain. >> so the debate will continue. mike viqueira thank you so much. >>> at least 29 people are dead and 350 injured after two bombs exploded outside of two mosques. al jazeera is on the ground in the section of tripoli where the second blast occurred. >> reporter: two mosques were targeted in the northern city of tripoli. behind me you can see the destruction and carnage. there is a lot of chaos here. people are angry and upset. we believe they were car bombs and
. two firefighters and one civilian have been injured in those fires. >>> turning to washington and the snub heard around the world. president obama abruptly canceling next month's planned meet with russian president vladimir putin. while it's not a complete return to the cold war, there is a chill in the air between the u.s. and russia. nbc's trace iie potts joins me m washington. the president's snub has many wondering, what happens now? >> reporter: next, betty, we wait to see what russia's response is. we'll have two officials right here in washington tomorrow. we'll monitor that for you. here on capitol hill, democrats and republicans are supporting the president's decision. >> and the first impression they get -- >> reporter: secretary of state john kerry and defense secretary chuck hagel are still set to meet their russian counterparts in washington tomorrow. even though president obama canceled his moscow summit with russian president vladimir putin. >> we were not at the point in our progress on a number of these issues where a summit at the presidential level was the m
in washington but first this report from jane ferguson. >> reporter: anti-military retestprotests in egypt has cha. they replace the demonstrations. here, around a thousand people gathered around the migathered . >> translator: i'm here to say no with an open chest. i know there are murders from the army and thugs with the police at any moment but i am standing here steadfast with us. >> reporter: the protests are daily now and they are noisy. they are in honor to protest and to avoid the serious crack downs. on tuesday, the anti-coup alliance says it has a new tactic to try to maintain. >> translator: the situation in this is tense what we do in each area and also depends on the curfew. there's demonstrations. every government has its own. some you will find -- the change in protests. >> reporter: the presidential candidate, the country called terrorism. that's the way those supporting the military-led government have been referring to those opposed to them. >> translator: issue needs to be raised. will anyone accept egypt to be a victim of a terrorism. this is the issue, egypt will not accep
>>> coming up, 50 years after dr. king's historic speech in washington, kim lawton reports on an interfaith effort at reconciliation in the community torn by the trayvon martin tragedy. >> how do you judge the content of a person's character? >> and from north carolina, lucky severson has the story of a protest movement called moral monday. >> forward together, not one step back! >> immore monday is a term i have used, and i do believe it is true. >>> major funding for "religion and ethics newsweekly" is provided by the lilly endowment, an indianapolis based private family foundation dedicated to its founders' interest in religion, community development, and education. additional funding also provided by mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. and the corporation for public broadcasting. >>> welcome. i'm fred de sam lazaro sitting in for bob be aer thety. thank you for joining us. religion groups are among those marking the 50th anniversary of the march on washington with a series of events
think about the march on washington they only think about the dream speech and that part of the speech. they don't think about anything else and you are right. he said a lot harsher things than anyone talked about. this is including the absence of women on the stage on purpose. they even missed the dream part of the speech. they were looking so much for the violence that they did not see it. i'm wondering how they thought, with anyen there, notice that they've missed the story. >> i want to address media coverage on the march on washington and i remember the three major networks were there. withoutered it interruption and they broadcasted it to europe. "the washington post" assign more than 60 reporters to cover that story. it was really big news. a congressman, you said that the civil rights movement without the media would be like a bird without wings. what did you mean? >> i meant that. >> i know you did, but tell us what you meant. without the media, especially in the american south, without reporters, without the photographer, without the cameras to bring the message .nto the livi
the march on washington, looking back and remembering both the dream and the dreamer. >> and the army doctor turned killer, a jury decides whether he lives or if he dies. >> the syrian government now calling on the u.n. to investigate chemical weapons on syrian army soldiers. syrian ambassadors gathering in new york to discuss potential military intervention there. meanwhile u.n. chemical inspectors continue their investigation into the august 21st attack i in a suburb of damascus. prime minister david cameron calling for meetings. >>> joining us now for the latest diplomat i can updates. do we now know what was on the draft resolution on the part of the british government? >> we don't. no one is leaking over this. normally there are a few leaks, but on this occasion we really don't know what is in this document. to be clear there was a meeting in the side room involving the five permanent security council. the united kingdom, the united states, france, russia, and china. there was also a meeting taking place, and i it's still going on at the u.n. involving haiti. after either of those meeti
into what started ask apartment fire in southeast washington that sent six people to the hospital. no word on the extent of the injuries. that fires started in the 800 block of denver street. we will have a live report from the scene coming up at the top of our 5:00 hour. >> following another developing story, out of d.c. this morning that's where police are looking into an officer involved shooting. now the detailed are very squares, but we do know that a suspect shot a juvenile in the 3,000 block of deboyce street. at some point, a police officer also damaged his or her weapon, there's still no word on where that suspect is this morning. well, switching gears now to the story that has the whole country buzzing. >> yeah, a winning power ball numbers were drawn, and there are three winning tickets splitting that $448 million jackpot. what are holds these numbers is about to collect a serious chunk of change. there are three jackpot winning tickets and those lucky people will share roughly $448 million. >> two of the winning tickets were sold in new jersey, one at the super stop and shop in
his vacation from the war room inside the war room and from washington, we also have mother jones magazine dark money reporter andy krohl. is this kind of hinge illegal, unethical, is it just a coincidence, bad judgment on booker's part, a combination of all of it. when i read this story, i thought that it was one of the most corrupt schemes to deliver personal money to a u.s. senate candidate that i've seen in a long time. what do you think? volunteer well, i think it raises a whole bunch of red flags about cory booker, and about how he interacts with the people who, you know, both people that he, who's interests he could be legislating or deciding on if he does become -- does he does go to congress, and also just issues about who funds his campaign. there are so may be murky overlaps here and ethical trip wires, if you will, about this whole, you know, you tube wanna-be venture that he is a part of. you also saw that the john of jeff zuker, the head of cnn, his 14-year-old son was on the board and had stock options for this company, as well. now i see the news coming out later t
in the 1963 march on washington remember the events of that day in a discussion hosted by the martin luther king, jr. memorial library in washington, d.c. this is an hour 30 minutes. >> when our archivist suggested that i conduct oral histories with people that attended the march, i jumped at the opportunity to hear firsthand accounts of the days that i, like many of you, had only known about in books, photos and media reflections. i was curious about literal and other journeys that people took to get to the lincoln memorial on that hot august day in 1963. we put out a call for people it into the march to be interviewed and the panelists here today were the first to answer that call. it is important to note that this is the beginning of an ongoing project and derek and our collection not only oral histories but also memorabilia and other artifacts from the march to the washingtonian the community archive. two of the panelists, peter bailey and doctor ella kelly were right under my nose as their regular attendees to the black studies lecture series that takes place in the black study center
which found the unemployment rate went up in 28 state and declined in eight states. "washington journal" is next. >> the president's plan to try to keep college more affordable is already getting some reaction from capitol hill. we might have to weigh in. some are in support and some are critical saying the new ranging system that the president put out is arbitrary. meantime college can cost up to $30,000 year on average now for some folks and the debt load students carrying can be the same amount. with that background is the cost of college worth it? that's the question for you this friday morning. republicans call 202-585-3881, democrats 202-585-3880 and independents 202-585-3882. look forward to your calls and also your participation by social media. you can send us a tweet at twitter @c-span wj. you can also send an e-mail journal@c-span.org. is the cost of college worth it? allen writes, it used to be but right now it slightly losing steam. now people that are caught with a minimum of expectations while being strapped with a new burden of paying back the loan making short m
, that is the future we must move toward no matter where it is. tom foreman, cnn, washington. >>> hello, again, a look at our top stories now. in california, a raging wildfire is exploding in size and spreading inside the yosemite national park. it has been 50 years on the east coast since martin luther king jr. made his famous speech and thousands today are gathering on the washington mall to secelebre that historic event and marian berry joining us live later on this hour. in california, a wildfire is burning almost out of control through parts of the state. the rim fire is burning so fast, it has doubled in size in a day. the fire has also spread to the western edge of the park. nick has been following developments for us. >> reporter: fred, is sun has come up here and it's given us a fresh perspective of how devastating the fire has been. this goes back a couple hundred yards at least and it's going things like this, scorching the earth and singeing the edges. at least 126,000 acres burned and it's been very unforgiving in its pattern. you see here, fire completely jumped over this road, scorched
anniversary of the march on washington. wasn't it exciting to see the enthusiasm and the film of the people of the day? who could have expected so many of us would be here who had ties to all that was owing on? who could suspect that we would all be with john lewis? [applause] attorney general, mr. mayor, you honor us with your presence. .he fierce urgency of now words rang out across the national mall, the call echoed in households across america. the summons ignited a movement to make real the promise of democracy. of course everyone knows the "i had a dream" speech, but the fierce urgency of now part of it was not only an inspiration, it was a motivation to act. was not the first time dr. martin luther king jr. urged fellow travelers to reject the status quo, to in his words at the march, refuse to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. seven years early now to trim of in francisco, my hometown, 1956, dr. king delivered the same message to the delegates of the naacp convention. --said "now i realize those all over are telling us we must slow up, he said, but we cannot afford this slo
>> rose: welcome to the program. august 28, 2013, marks 50th anniversary of the march on washington, and the famous speech by dr. martin luther kino congressman johning with, who with dr. king. progress. back in 1963, charlie, let me tell you, i s that said white waing, colored waiting, those signs are gone. we passed the civil rights bill. we passed the voting right act, the fair housing act. and when people say to me nothing has checked. i say come dalk in my scooz. >> we talk with jonathan rider, isabelle wilkerson, and clarence jones. >> the march was nmy view, the culminn ofio 100 years of frustration and despair. 1963 began with the centennial, the 100th anniversary of the emancipation proclamation. and that means that when these people came together, those quarter of a million people came together, they were in some ways representing all the hopes and dreams that had idea yt to be fulfull fulfilled. >> rose: the 50th anniversary of the march on washington next. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we be
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